Powers is an American creator-owned police procedural comic book series by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Avon Oeming. The series' first. Anyway, we are here to speak about Powers, the comic books, not that horrendous TV adaptation with Sharlto Copley – Let's hope that thing. tombdetercomi.ml: Welcome to the Official Site for DC. DC is home to the "World's Greatest Super Heroes,” including SUPERMAN, BATMAN, WONDER WOMAN.

    Author:SANTO DOSECK
    Language:English, Spanish, Indonesian
    Country:France
    Genre:Academic & Education
    Pages:399
    Published (Last):19.03.2016
    ISBN:464-4-46436-692-8
    Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
    Uploaded by: LEOTA

    71797 downloads 85016 Views 10.86MB ePub Size Report


    Powers Comic Book

    Powers is a comic book series originally created by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Avon Oeming in It was originally published by Image. 9 Results tombdetercomi.ml is the source for Marvel comics, digital comics, comic strips, and more featuring Iron Man, Spider-Man, Hulk, X-Men and all your favorite. Powers, Vol. 1 book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for Published August 29th by Image Comics (first published September 1st.

    Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again.

    The Sellouts Powers Vol. The investigation leads to a particular superhero who oversteps his power and authority and causes international devastation, as a result of which all powers are declared illegal by the United States Government. Forever Powers Vol. Legends Powers Vol. Pilgrim is captured and tortured by a target of their investigation, and subsequently gains superpowers of her own.

    Calista assists Walker and Pilgrim by revealing herself as the reincarnated Retro Girl, and she subsequently inspires other heroes to resume fighting crime despite the ban.

    Psychotic Powers Vol. The Blackguard's nemesis is also found murdered, and the detectives believe the jewel is the reason for these events.

    Powers (2009 - 2012)

    During the investigation, Pilgrim uses her powers to kill her ex-boyfriend after he tries to kill her. Cosmic Powers Vol. Pilgrim becomes aware that she is being investigated by Internal Affairs for her recent actions, and Walker is contacted by the Millennium Guard to take the place of the earlier victim.

    When he accepts, he is given new powers. Walker also begins a romantic relationship with a witness to the murder. Secret Identity Powers Vol. As the investigation continues, more and more members of The Heroes are killed, and evidence points to Queen Noir as the prime suspect. During the case, Pilgrim discovers that Walker has powers, and then disappears.

    Pilgrim is the primary suspect, as the powers she contracted in the Legends Arc are revealed to be a strain of the virus. Walker attempts to discover the source of the epidemic while Pilgrim does her own investigation.

    Pilgrim is exonerated when she helps crack the case, and instead of dealing with the bad publicity that revealing all her activities would bring, she is essentially bought off by the city and leaves the force. Z Powers Vol. Sunrise continues her covert Internal Affairs-directed investigation of Walker, but slowly becomes more hesitant to inform on him. Walker proposes to his girlfriend Heather, but she is receiving visions detailing a forthcoming apocalyptic battle, and leaves without telling him she is pregnant.

    Pilgrim returns to Chicago, now a member of the F. Gods Powers Vol. They succeed in defeating her, but in the aftermath of the battle, Walker, Triphammer and Calista are missing, and all powers-related cases are permanently assigned to the F.

    Undercover Powers Bureau Vol. Pilgrim is exposed to the Power who is supplying the syndicate with semen, and learns that she is pregnant. Icons Powers Bureau Vol. Characters[ edit ] Despite the high mortality rate, there are several recurrent characters in Powers beyond the main two. Oeming has praised Bendis' writing in giving a "real depth" to even minor figures, writing that he particularly enjoys Bendis writing "a character as an asshole and then we [the reader] learn they are more valiant than most of the [other] characters.

    Veteran cop Walker was previously a power called Diamond before losing his abilities. Walker and Pilgrim investigate the murder of the Blackguard, a superhero whose power stemmed from a magic jewel. The Blackguard's nemesis is also found murdered, and the detectives believe the jewel is the reason for these events.

    During the investigation, Pilgrim uses her powers to kill her ex-boyfriend after he tries to kill her. Walker and Pilgrim investigate the death of a seemingly normal person who is later revealed to be a member of an alien organization called the Millennium Guard. Pilgrim becomes aware that she is being investigated by Internal Affairs for her recent actions, and Walker is contacted by the Millennium Guard to take the place of the earlier victim.

    When he accepts, he is given new powers. Walker also begins a romantic relationship with a witness to the murder. Walker and Pilgrim investigate the murder of Queen Noir's husband Strike.

    As the investigation continues, more and more members of The Heroes are killed, and evidence points to Queen Noir as the prime suspect. During the case, Pilgrim discovers that Walker has powers, and then disappears. A "Powers Virus" spreads throughout the city, and numerous young girls are falling victim to it. Pilgrim is the primary suspect, as the powers she contracted in the Legends Arc are revealed to be a strain of the virus.

    Walker attempts to discover the source of the epidemic while Pilgrim does her own investigation. Pilgrim is exonerated when she helps crack the case, and instead of dealing with the bad publicity that revealing all her activities would bring, she is essentially bought off by the city and leaves the force.

    A year after the end of the last arc, Walker and his new partner Enki Sunrise investigate the murder of Z, whom Walker teamed up with in World War 2. Sunrise continues her covert Internal Affairs-directed investigation of Walker, but slowly becomes more hesitant to inform on him. Walker proposes to his girlfriend Heather, but she is receiving visions detailing a forthcoming apocalyptic battle, and leaves without telling him she is pregnant.

    Pilgrim returns to Chicago, now a member of the F. After closing the Z case, members of The Golden Ones, a god-like team of heroes, are targeted by a serial killer, with the mother of the murdered Damocles attempting to gain revenge on the world by launching a titanic assault on Chicago. They succeed in defeating her, but in the aftermath of the battle, Walker, Triphammer and Calista are missing, and all powers-related cases are permanently assigned to the F.

    Newly brought on as Federal agents, Walker goes undercover to try and infiltrate a criminal organization breeding powers babies. Pilgrim is exposed to the Power who is supplying the syndicate with semen, and learns that she is pregnant. Agents Pilgrim and Walker travel to Hollywood to investigate the death of several powers and uncover one of the darkest secrets of American superpower history.

    Despite the high mortality rate, there are several recurrent characters in Powers beyond the main two. Oeming has praised Bendis' writing in giving a "real depth" to even minor figures, writing that he particularly enjoys Bendis writing "a character as an asshole and then we [the reader] learn they are more valiant than most of the [other] characters. One of the series' recurring motifs, which begins in issue 4, is the liberal use of cameos. Investigating their first major crime, Walker and Pilgrim question 32 superheroes and five pages later, 32 super villains for leads.

    Described by Bendis as both "one of [his and Oeming's] best ideas" and a "'logistical nightmare'," many of these cameo-characters were lent by "well-known comic book creator friends" of Bendis and Oeming to add a level of metatextuality and flesh out the wider Powers universe. Other creators who have lent their time and characters to Powers include: Powers issue 7 "Ride Along" introduced author Warren Ellis into the Powers universe, as a writer of " graphic novels " who accompanies Walker on a "ride along" for research purposes.

    In issue 23, an analogue of Dark Horse Comics editor Diana Schutz is interviewed on the problematic nature of vigilante superheroes who exist above the normal system of law, and why non-powered individuals might feel betrayed by, wary or resentful of them.

    In his introduction to the bonus materials section of Powers: The covers were styled after the following magazines:. Under Icon , some of Volume 2's covers have been drawn in the style of various classic movie posters.

    Specifically, 7— The first through fourth story arcs, "Who Killed Retro Girl? The story "Little Deaths" is also incomplete. Greg Rucka and Ed Brubaker , whom Bendis and Oeming view as "amazing crime writers," created Gotham Central , which Bendis and Oeming view as one of many Powers -like comics influenced by their work.

    Bendis notes that Rucka and Brubaker gave himself and Oeming a "heads up" that they were preparing a "cop book in the DC Universe," and entirely separate from the plethora of titles which seem to merely be attempting to ape Powers. The full title of all volumes listed here start with " Powers: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

    Powers The cover of Supergroup, a compilation of issues 15 to Main article: Powers U. TV series. Their replies very expressive of their individual personalities, both in the case of the heroes and villains.

    Powers comic books issue 1

    The storyline in this is dark, but not too dark. Suitably noirish.

    The character development is pretty well-done. Christian Walker has the physique of a superhero like Superman or Batman, and the stoic demeanor, specifically the latter crimefighter.

    He also has a sense of latent anguish that his inquisitive partner ends up digging away at until he reveals a surprising past that provides a bond to the superhero community. It's clear that these super-powered people have very human personalities, both in the good and bad ways, as the reader finds out more about Retro Girl and the people who knew her closest.

    Murder is always a tough subject. In this case, the reveal on who killed Retro Girl mirrors the senselessness of violent crime that we see in our real life societies.

    One would think that a superhero would be safe from such violence, but people always seem to find a way to harm each other. The artwork is tailored to the noir storyline, with bold lines and figures, and the backgrounds done in shadows with minimal bright colors.

    The creators of the series studied the use of lighting in cinema, and it shows in the art design of this book. This is a good start to a series. I'll be coming back because the storyline is very intriguing to me. Overall rating: May 05, James DeSantis rated it liked it. Unlike most comic fans I enjoy a lot of bendis stuff. I know some of it isn't loved X-men and most current comics from here but I still like a lot of it.

    So I decided to try out powers. Always seemed like a cool subject matter. Have regular officers deal with superhero issues. Basic right? However built it's in own world it could really turn out to be something very interesting. What I liked: Christian Walker and Deena make a good combo. Christian typical badass who seems not to want to be bothered by anyone, including his new rookie partner.

    However the more you get to know each of them the more you understand their difference of how they were raised and also why they are bitter in different ways. On top of that I enjoyed the art a lot. Reminded me of the 90's batman type cartoon feel.

    The dialog was also a lot of fun, especially at the end. The last Confession room scene was great. What I didn't like: Some of the dialog was too much. Sometimes taking forever to get to the end of the page because of needless dialog about nothing or repeats. Also the plot feels a little "been there done that" which is surprise since I really was sucked into Jessica Jones which is a very "detective" feel as well.

    Overall I enjoyed it. Some flaws but I want to get more invested in this world. At the moment I'd give it a Let's see how much better it gets! Jul 19, Jesse A rated it it was ok Shelves: Didn't overly care for this one. Just didn't click for me. Jul 21, Cara rated it really liked it Shelves: This book was great! I've never read a comic where there is an investigation into the death of a superhero.

    People just don't go around murdering superheroes. But this time someone did. This was part police procedural, part superhero comic, and part super awesome!

    I can't wait to read the rest of this. Nov 23, Rauf rated it liked it Shelves: It's a murder mystery in a world like ours but full of people with superpowers. It starts out alright. The indestructible Retro Girl is found dead. Detectives Christian Walker and Deena Pilgrim try to find out who did it. My favorite part is when the police couldn't perform an autopsy on Retro Girl's corpse Nothing can pierces her skin. At one point they even apply a blowtorch on her and still her skin is unscathed.

    And when Walker and Pilgrim asked the parody of famous superheroes and villain It's a murder mystery in a world like ours but full of people with superpowers. And when Walker and Pilgrim asked the parody of famous superheroes and villains about Khaotic Chic. The dialogues are also really good. I always love a good banter. I didn't like the ending though. It reeked of deus ex machina. And one of the great things about reading a murder mystery is as we read, we always try to guess who the killer is by reading all the clues.

    Brian Michael Bendis, however, didn't put that much clues and suspects. I didn't feel involved with the pursuit. Plus the artwork is kind of sloppy sometimes. Still an OK read, though because Who killed Retro Girl? All of America is asking themselves this question on the day the body of Retro Girl, a globally beloved superhero and American sweetheart, is found, throat slit and neck broken, outside an elementary school in the city she worked and presumably lived in.

    Retro Girl's somewhat dangerous ties to crime boss Jonny Royalle come into question, her relationships with various other superheroes, and Her relationship with Detective Walker all come under the microscope as the hunt for her killer drags on. Walker works alone, Deena idolizes him. Can their partnership ever work?

    And if it does, can they ever find out who burned out their city's star? Powers has been on my TBR for almost two years. One of the first books I marked as 'to-read', actually. Don't ask me why it took me so long, because I do not have an answer for you.

    The story is timeless. A superhero dies, a nation mourns, and their killer must be brought to justice. You can't really get burnt out on this storyline, it's gripping. The characters are deep and personal, the dialogue is priceless, and the story is tight.

    Powers ( - Present) | Comic Books | Comics | tombdetercomi.ml

    Nothing to complain about and a lot to praise- hence the five stars. Art specs Pat Garrahy respect these artists by knowing their names, people is a master. My favorite comic artist is John Romita Jr.

    My inner eight-year-old is losing her mind because this freaking looks like the DC and Marvel cartoons that filled my childhood years when I wasn't watching Japanese action cartoons or Loony Toons.

    Hence my 'violent personality', if you ask my family. I grew up in the 's, when this book was published. I can clearly see where all those animators got their inspiration from. Garrahy is amazing, and I can't do anything but praise his work. Know the names, people. It doesn't take much. This comic is a must-read for any crime fiction or superhero fan, and I must recommend this amazing volume.

    It isn't one of the hardcover 'definitive' editions, but it does include concept art and the introductory Powers comic strip that was used to promote the comic before the first issue dropped.

    And to have worked so hard and still have nothing, it kills me. This is 96 of the top graphic novels list. I loved this interesting new telling of the super-hero world. Heroes can lose their powers at any time, invulnerable heroes can be killed. Even the villains can occasionally be helpful. Christian is the powerful detective leading an investigation in the death of the most popular hero ever, Retro Girl. He also acquires a young girl who was the victim of a hostage situation.

    He ends up kind of babysitting her while waiting for an absent CPS This is 96 of the top graphic novels list.

    He ends up kind of babysitting her while waiting for an absent CPS that never shows up. Deena Pilgrim, Christian's brand new partner in his investigations. She is cute, sweet, and very inquisitive. Sharper than Christian believes, and much more bull-dogged than he wishes her to be.

    She also wears belly shirts, which is awesome, because she's hot and cute at the same time. Their case takes them through 32 super-heroes, and 32 super-villains. They end up questioning a teleporter based on a hotshot up and coming detectives hubris. The surprise reveal of the killer is kind of a let down, but the end is really cool. I hear there's a TV show, maybe I'll check that out too.

    My first introduction to Bendis's creator owned work and it's rather good. The art is simplistic but it grows on you.

    I have to read more of this before I make a definitive opinion. Mar 24, Jedhua rated it liked it Shelves: Book Info: This collection contains Powers issues Other Useful Reviews: Retro Girl , venerated detective Christian Walker is tasked with investigating the incident. Together with his gutsy new partner, Deena Pilgrim, the two find themselves faced with arguably the biggest case of their careers, and must outmaneuver the efforts of a rival dete Book Info: Together with his gutsy new partner, Deena Pilgrim, the two find themselves faced with arguably the biggest case of their careers, and must outmaneuver the efforts of a rival detective determined to take over their case.

    With the eyes of the entire country watching, and left with a lack of workable leads, the case proves extremely challenging. But as the investigation proceeds, Deena becomes increasingly suspicious Walker is hiding something, and the further they get the more it looks like Walker himself holds the key to solving the entire thing. Let's just get that out of the way. I think it's much better to say that it's a distinctive and unusual style, but it's simply not how people talk; I'm not saying that the writer is on the wrong track here, but his approach doesn't seem completely accurate.

    The way I see it, Bendis has merely taken certain aspects of human interaction not often portrayed in comics and plays them out to the extreme. Few people I know of pointlessly interrupt one another as often as Bendis' characters, nor do they repeatedly parrot back what the other person said in question form to check if they heard right.

    Related:


    Copyright © 2019 tombdetercomi.ml.